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Welcome to First Things First, Adweek’s new daily resource for marketers. We’ll be publishing the content to First Things First on Adweek.com each morning (like this post), but if you prefer that it come straight to your inbox, you can sign up for the email here.

Fact Check: Did That Dumb Peloton Ad Really Tank the Brand’s Stock?

Just about everything that could be said, has been said about Peloton’s problematic ad about a woman who receives a Peloton bike for Christmas from her husband. But one of those things that’s been said is the ad is tanking Peloton’s stock price. That’s likely not the case. There’s a few key things at play: When Peloton went public in September, analysts were leery of it being overvalued. A strong Black Friday, likely prompted investors to sell.

Read more: We’ve got more info on the ad, including Peloton’s response to its critics.

Viacom and CBS Have Officially Merged, Creating ViacomCBS

The only will they/won’t they couple in TV that lasted longer than Viacom and CBS’s merger dance may have been Ross and Rachel. 14 years after the companies split, they are finally back together. As rivals completed their own mergers, CBS and Viacom’s merger helps them achieve the scale they need to remain competitive.

Read more: TV editor Jason Lynch explains how the merger will impact both companies.

Shutterstock Predicts ‘Maximalist’ Hues Will Dominate Marketing and Creativity in 2020

Each year, Shutterstock analyzes images from million users to forecast what colors will emerge in the following year as favorites among marketers and creatives. What’s ahead for 2020? Shutterstock thinks creatives will return to ‘maximalist’ hot hues: Lush lava is a deep, striking blood orange; aqua menthe is a cyan mint green that’s a little washed out, and a little retro; and phantom blue is a rich indigo blue with a little purple in it.

Read it: See the colors in action.

Throwback Thursday: Can You Guess Whether These Hallmark Holiday Movies Are Real or Fake?

With each passing year, more and more networks are getting in on the holiday movie extravaganza because they’re mega-ad revenue generators. With more original made-for-TV movies being made each year, let’s face it: The names of these films are getting out of control. Last year, we went out to Bryant Park to ask Hallmark fans whether they could discern the real movie titles from fake ones.

Here’s a little taste, real or fake? (Answers below Best of the Rest)

1) A Gingerbread Romance
2) Jingle All the Sleigh
3) Christmas Wrap Battle
4) A Shoe Addict’s Christmas

Watch it: See how you’d fare in Hallmark Holiday Movies: Real or Fake?

Related: How Hallmark Channel Made Christmas the Most Lucrative Time of the Year

Best of the Rest: Today’s Top News and Insights

1) Real 2) Fake 3) Fake 4) Real

How can younger employees advocate for themselves/celebrate their accomplishments without being perceived as a braggart?

David Rosenbaum, evp, group account director, Havas Media

Don’t seek a pat on the back. Be committed, be passionate, be collaborative, be empathetic and the recognition will follow.

Bruce Drinkwater, CEO, StormBrands

As the saying goes, there is no “I” in team. So celebrate the team, not just your individual achievements. There should be no need to brag; continued hard work and enthusiasm will deliver the results you want and speak volumes for you. A reasonable does of humility will likely mean the team will be your ambassadors too, and support your career progression.

Mike Gatti, executive creative director, GYK Antler

It’s all about the forum in which the accomplishments are heralded. If they don’t already have standing meetings with their managers, find time to sit down with them. Talking to your manager through the projects one has worked on, asking for feedback on where improvements are needed, as well as thoughts on what went well, is a great way to frame things. Offering to present those same projects at an agency all-hands meeting is another way to get the word out there, and one that does double duty at making yourself a better presenter to boot.

Jameson is Adweek's Chief of Staff.