Facebook’s Guidelines On Promotions Translated

Marketers: Do you still find Facebook's guidelines on promotions to be confusing? Fear not: Media Logic brought some, well, logic to the process of interpreting them.

Marketers: Do you still find Facebook’s guidelines on promotions to be confusing? Fear not: Media Logic brought some, well, logic to the process of interpreting them.

Media Logic conversation manager Melissa Fiorenza combed through the social network’s promotions guidelines and translated them into simple English.

Highlights from Fiorenza’s post on the Media Logic blog are summarized below.

  • What constitutes a promotion? If you intend to pick a winner, you’re running a promotion — and, therefore, have to follow the rules.
  • What must be acknowledged before running a promotion? Facebook requires each entrant to completely release it from obligations, and it requires marketers to state that the promotion is not sponsored, endorsed, or administered by the social network, and that participants are granting information to the marketer, and not Facebook. The social network doesn’t want to be connected, in any way, to your promotion, so just be sure to make that clear.
  • Where can you run a promotion? Promotions can be mentioned in wall posts, but the actual entry, registration, or voting must be conducted without using Facebook features such as likes, check-ins, and comments. They must appear on canvas pages or page tabs.
  • How can winners be contacted? In any way marketers choose, except Facebook. Entry forms should secure participants’ email addresses, postal addresses, or phone numbers.
  • How can winners be chosen? The official rules of the promotion should spell out how this will be done, but Facebook functionality cannot be used.

Fiorenza concluded:

Seeing so many brands successfully getting away with wall contests — and watching their engagement levels spike as a result — makes it tempting to join the fray and sneak one (or a few) through. But as you saw earlier, there are cases of promotions getting pulled abruptly for breaking the rules, and a page termination isn’t out of the question, either. As if Facebook’s eyes weren’t enough, there’s even evidence of brands trying to out brands. Whether you’re representing your own brand or someone else’s, we say the risk isn’t worth the consequences. Just make up for it with a legal promotion that speaks for itself…and hey, we can help with that.


david.cohen@adweek.com David Cohen is editor of Adweek's Social Pro Daily.
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