social-pro-daily

Instagram’s Use of Third-Party Fact-Checkers Goes Global

Content and ads from politicians are not subject to review

Instagram began testing parent company Facebook’s third-party fact-checking initiative in the U.S. in May, and Monday, the program was expanded worldwide.

The social network’s 45 third-party fact-checkers will independently assess and rate false information on Instagram in order to help detect it and reduce its distribution.

Instagram said in a blog post that content rated as false or partly false by a third-party fact checker will be removed from its Explore tab and hashtag pages in order to reduce its distribution, and it will be labeled in order to enable people to better decide for themselves what to read, trust and share.

The labels link to the rating from the fact-checker and provide links to articles from credible sources that debunk the questionable content.

Those labels will appear worldwide in feed, profile, Stories and Instagram Direct messages.

Instagram is using image-matching technology to find duplicates of the content and label them, and content that is rated false or partly false on Facebook will automatically be labeled as such on Instagram, as well.

The company uses a combination of feedback from its community and artificial intelligence to determine which content should be passed along to third-party fact-checkers for review.

The Facebook-owned photo- and video-sharing network added a way for its users to report potential false information in August.

However, in line with the policies of its parent company, organic content and ads from politicians will not be subject to fact-checking.

Instagram said in its blog post, “We want you to trust what you see on Instagram. Photo- and video-based misinformation is increasingly a challenge across our industry and something our teams have been focused on addressing.”


david.cohen@adweek.com David Cohen is editor of Adweek's Social Pro Daily.
{"channel":"","sortby":"","label":"","shouldShow":""}