News Corp.’s Dow Jones Files Lawsuit in Stab at Aggregators

Dow Jones & Co., the News Corp. unit that operates Dow Jones Newswires, The Wall Street Journal, MarketWatch and other financial-news providers, today announced a lawsuit against online purveyor of “live market analysis” Briefing.com.

Dow Jones says that Briefing has engaged in “systematic and often instantaneous misappropriation of headlines and articles from Dow Jones Newswires.” Dow Jones says that over the course of two weeks, Briefing copied portions of more than 100 Dow Jones stories and over 70 headlines and published them within three minutes of their appearance.

“Dow Jones respects and defends the rights of other news organizations to report on news events in a timely manner. Here, however, Briefing.com did not use its own resources to uncover, verify and describe news events. It waited for Dow Jones to do all the work, and then simply copied the content,” said Dow Jones general counsel Mark Jackson in a statement.

The suit should be less than shocking to anyone who’s familiar with News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch’s attitude toward online aggregators. A proponent of online subscription models for newspapers, Murdoch has publicly bristled at Google and other Internet portals for what he sees as theft of News Corp. content.

We called and emailed Briefing.com for comment. We’ll update when we hear back.

(h/t paidContent)

Press release after the jump.


NEW YORK — (BUSINESS WIRE) — Dow Jones & Company filed suit today to stop the theft of its content by Briefing.com.

The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, details Briefing.com’s systematic and often instantaneous misappropriation of headlines and articles from Dow Jones Newswires, the leading real-time financial newswire.

“Dow Jones invests considerable resources to produce timely and trusted news and business information,” said Mark H. Jackson, general counsel for Dow Jones. “Briefing.com has been brazenly taking a free ride on the reputation of our publications and on the investment Dow Jones makes in quality, real-time journalism.”

In just one two-week period, Briefing.com copied a substantial portion of at least 100 articles and republished more than 70 headlines within three minutes of the initial publication on Dow Jones Newswires.

Briefing.com charges a fee for a subscription to its Web site, and it is also available through Bloomberg, FactSet, Thomson Reuters and similar vendors, placing it in direct competition with Dow Jones Newswires.

The lawsuit, which includes claims for copyright infringement and “hot news” misappropriation, says that in this case Briefing.com did not rely on its own sources or other newsgathering efforts. Instead, Briefing.com cut and pasted Dow Jones content and included the pirated material in its cheaper product.

“Dow Jones respects and defends the rights of other news organizations to report on news events in a timely manner. Here, however, Briefing.com did not use its own resources to uncover, verify and describe news events. It waited for Dow Jones to do all the work, and then simply copied the content,” Mr. Jackson said. “In order to continue to offer the quality news and business information customers expect and count on, Dow Jones will take action to stop the misappropriation of its content.”

The law firm of Patterson, Belknap, Webb & Tyler represents Dow Jones in this matter.



Publish date: April 20, 2010 https://dev.adweek.com/digital/news-corp-s-dow-jones-files-lawsuit-in-stab-at-aggregators/ © 2020 Adweek, LLC. - All Rights Reserved and NOT FOR REPRINT
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