Twitter Details Changes to Content Moderation During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Much like YouTube and Facebook, machine learning systems will carry a heavier load

Daily quality assurance checks are being performed on Twitter's content enforcement processes - Credit by bombuscreative/iStock
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Twitter provided an update on how it plans to keep its platform up and running during the coronavirus pandemic, as well as further steps it is taking to protect its employees.

In moves similar to those revealed by YouTube and Facebook, more monitoring of potentially abusive and manipulative content will be handled by Twitter’s machine learning systems.

Legal, policy and trust and safety lead Vijaya Gadde and customers lead Matt Derella said in a blog post, “While we work to ensure that our systems are consistent, they can sometimes lack the context that our teams bring, and this may result in us making mistakes. As a result, we will not permanently suspend any accounts based solely on our automated enforcement systems. Instead, we will continue to look for opportunities to build in human review checks where they will be most impactful. We appreciate your patience as we work to get it right—this is a necessary step to scale our work to protect the conversation on Twitter.”

Twitter is continuing to build systems that enable its teams to enforce its rules remotely around the world, and it is increasing employee assistance and wellness support for everyone involved in this type of work.

The social network is also instituting a global content severity triage system in order to ensure that content that presents the biggest risk of harm is addressed first.

Daily quality assurance checks are being performed on its content enforcement processes in order to ensure that the company is agile in responding to rapidly developing issues.

And Twitter continues to engage with its partners globally to keep escalation paths open and remain aware of urgent cases.

Finally, the Twitter Rules are being reviewed for potential changes that may need to be implemented in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

Gadde and Derella wrote, “As we’ve said on many occasions, our approach to protecting the public conversation is never static. That’s particularly relevant in these unprecedented times. We intend to review our thinking daily, and we will ensure that we’re sharing updates here on any new guidance.”


david.cohen@adweek.com David Cohen is editor of Adweek's Social Pro Daily.
Publish date: March 17, 2020 https://dev.adweek.com/digital/twitter-details-changes-to-content-moderation-during-the-coronavirus-pandemic/ © 2020 Adweek, LLC. - All Rights Reserved and NOT FOR REPRINT